What Age Should You Let Your Child Get a Nose Piercing?

a teenager with nose piercing

I love piercings. I have always been drawn to them, even as a little girl.

Nose piercings are particularly beautiful when they are done correctly. A child might see a lovely nose piercing and want one of their own.

When is it okay and when should you say no?

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When Should a Child Be Allowed to Get a Nose Piercing?

The legal age for getting a cartilage piercing is 16. This is generally the preferred age for most tattoo parlors, which is where the majority of these piercings take place. A child younger than 16 might get a piercing with parental consent, but they might not be prepared for the pain and upkeep.

Things to Consider Before Letting Your Child Get a Nose Piercing

Here are some of the things you should consider before letting your son or daughter get his or her nose pierced.

1. Nose Piercings Hurt

teen holding nose

I went with my friend Jo to get our noses pierced. She was the toughest woman I knew.

She shaved her head. She was covered in tattoos. She never backed down from a fight, and she always knew where to find one.

She also knew that I had always wanted to get my nose pierced. She asked me to go with her for a nose piercing. I excitedly agreed.

Jo went first. She sat in the chair, winked at me when the tattoo artist/piercer showed us the needle he would be using for the piercing, and placed her nose in his capable and heavily tattooed hands.

She was pierced within seconds. She was also sobbing and wailing in pain. She couldn’t stop crying. I asked the piercer if that was normal. He said yes. I said goodbye.

A child may think a nose piercing looks very cool, but they may not be prepared for the pain.

The pain doesn’t stop with the piercing either. Cartilage takes a long time to heal. It requires regular cleaning and can even then become infected. I have two piercings: my tragus and my faith.

Both are great now, but they were painful to get and even more painful to manage as infections kept coming and going in the weeks after each piercing.

2. Piercings Can be Permanent

One of the arguments about piercing is that the hole simply grows back when and if the child is no longer interested.

That isn’t always the case.

Sometimes scars form around the piercing. When the ring is removed, the scar remains. Many of these scars require corrective surgery that is costly and traumatic.

It’s also possible that a nose ring can be ripped out in an accident, which leads to severe damage and a large, permanent facial scar.

At age 15, I had a friend who was goofing around with another boy, and his nose ring was torn directly through this nose. We are both considerably older than 15 now, but his scar still remains.

A child needs to know that their immediate choice to get a nose ring can have long-lasting consequences. If they are able to understand that, they might be ready.

It’s Not Just About the Child
Something else you need to ask yourself as you read through this article is if you’re able and willing to deal with some of these consequences.

As a parent, you will have to deal with the emotional and financial burden of these decisions if something goes wrong.

3. There’s Some Care and Upkeep

piercing aftercare

The amount of time and effort it takes to ensure nose piercings stay clean, particularly in the weeks following the piercing, is something your child needs to understand.

Your piercer will give you instructions on how to clean the piercing. They must be followed to avoid infection and the possibility of a permanent scar.

If a child has to be reminded to brush their teeth, clip their fingernails, comb their hair, wash their face, etc., they are not ready for a nose piercing.

In fact, the nose piercing may be good motivation to get them to do those things without reminders.

Tell your child they can get a piercing if they can take care of their personal hygiene without reminders for an allotted period of time. They need to prove they are up to the challenge.

Key Takeaways

Nose piercings are no longer the punk rock taboo they once were. They are very common and can be quite lovely. However, they also require a lot of work. A child under age 16 should prove they are ready.

Do you agree or disagree? Tell us in the comments!

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Frequently Asked Questions

Minors aged 14 to 18 years old who want to receive any body piercing or tattoos need written consent from a parent or a legal guardian for them to receive a nose piercing. As long as you’re okay with it and the child is mature enough to take care of the piercing, it’s worth considering.

Minors need parental consent or consent from a legal guardian to receive a nose piercing (or any kind of body piercings). As long as you’re okay with it and the child is mature enough to take care of the piercing to keep it from getting infected, it’s worth considering.

Once a child is a teenager (past 14 years of age) is a good time to start considering letting them get a nose piercing. Something else to keep in mind is how mature your teen is and whether they can take care of the piercing to keep it from getting infected.

Some schools may not allow nose piercing. Double-check your child’s school policy before allowing them to get their nose pierced.

  • I’m going through this now with my 13 year old daughter she’s been wanting it done she’s also tried doing it herself so I’m think I should just let her before she does it herself and something bad happens I’m also her mother that has a nose piercing I love mine I also have my Monroe I do want my eyesbrow done so I was thinking doing it together she is a pretty mature 13 year old the only thing with her is she hates cleaning keeping her room clean or keeping anything clean for that matter but other then that I feel she’s ready plus I don’t want her doing it herself with a push pin wth omg

    • Hey Shana, it’s always a delicate balance. On the one hand, you might not want to let her get her way just because she might be doing it anyway. On the other hand, it might be hard telling her no when you have your nose pierced. As you said, it might make a nice mother-daughter moment. Memories like that could last a lifetime as she’ll never forget her fun outing with her mom to get her nose pierced.